Given a choice between KitKat and Skittles, what would you pick? What if we told you that you could have both of them in one candy? Surprised? No, we aren’t bluffing. An Instagram page has shown us how to get the best of both worlds. Now, you can enjoy the colourful fun of Skittles candies with the creamy and crunchy texture of KitKat. In the video, posted on the page ‘whathowhystudio’, a person takes a bunch of Skittles in a bowl, and extracts their colours and flavours separately by mixing them with water. Then, he adds their colours to white chocolate.

In a KitKat-shaped mould, the coloured white chocolate is added, layered with plain molten white chocolate and thin wafer bars. This is frozen and brought out of the mould.

What we see next is the most colourful version of KitKat imaginable. The colours of red, orange, yellow, green and blue are equally layered over each bar of the chocolate. The caption for the video read, “Will it KitKat? Skittles.” Skittles are button-shaped candies containing different fruit flavours for each colour. Whereas, KitKat is a chocolaty wafer-bar confection.

So far, the video received over 16,000 likes.

Here is the video that shows the making of the Skittles-KitKat:

The Instagram page is full of wonders. And, food is at the centre of most of the experiments. In another video, we see how a slice of bread can slice a tomato into two halves. It’s no joke. You’ll know what we are talking about after you watch the video. The video is captioned, “Can you sharpen bread?” A man sharpens a slice of toasted bread on a knife-sharpening stone. Then he scratches it on a hard surface to show a scratch mark. With the help of this bread slice, he makes a slit on a sheet of paper. Thereafter, he slices a tomato into two halves by using that bread slice like a knife.

Watch this spectacular video here:

Another similar video on the same page shows how a sharpened KitKat can be used to slice a tomato into two halves.

Such experiments with food are always interesting to watch. Aren’t they?




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